George Legrady | Media Arts & Technology | Department of Art Courses
     
   
My courses focus on research and projects in digital media arts, with an emphasis on systems, semiotics, information theory and the impact of technology on representation, narrative and cultural practices. The intent is to integrate high end technological approaches into the design process for interactive media art: 1) conceptualization, research and development of realtime interactivity 2) functions of narrative and metaphoric expression in timed-based visualization and interface design
  3) algorithmic aesthetics: the exploration of computer programming, data organization and hardware design as forms of aesthetic research and practice 4) the integration of cultural analysis from diverse perspectives such as fine arts, critical theory, linguistics, comparative literature, media studies, etc. as a means to understand how culture and technology come together to generate new forms of perception, paradigms and belief systems.



2014 Winter  

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 4:00pm-53:50pm - Elings Hall 2611

 

 


A production course in data query, analysis, processing and visualization. The course begins with MySQL data query exercises to finetune data discovery skills. It is then followed by visualization assignments in the java based Processing environment. There are 4 projects: 1) A linear frequency visualization, 2) 2D spatial map, 3) a correlation with an external data source such as the NY TImes or Amazin, and 4) a 3D interactive visualization.

Every dataset contains the same scalar, numeric, time-based, semantic and other forms of metadata which allow for a multiplicity and complex modes of data correlation and representation. Our goal is to learn how to discover interesting patterns in the data, and how to visualizat it.

 


2013 Fall  

MAT 254
Arts & Engineering Research (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 12pm-1:50pm, Elings Hall 2611

 

 


Theoretical and applied directions in arts-engineering research currently taking place in the Experimental Visualization Lab. This course introduces methods, approaches, activities, and processes of sponsored research specific to the ExpVisLab. This quarter, the focus is on arts-engineering research.

 



2013 Spr  

MAT 265
Open Studio in Optical-Computational Processes (4 units)

Wednesday 2pm-6pm, Elings Hall 2611

 

MAT265
Computational Photography Resources Links


An open studio projects course in which students will define a problem, and focused on camera, laser, and any devices connected to a computer to realize visualizations and other time-based projects. Each student will plan, realize and evaluate a project of their own. The course will function in the tradition of the studio critique where students present work-in-progress, get regular feedback from faculty and course participants. Completion of course will require a project, concept statement and online documentation featured on the course website.

The course will be mostly lab, individual meetings, and appx 3 work-in-progress student presentations and depending on the range of participants’ interests, lectures may be given on topics such as anamorphs, experiments in multiple exposure, spatial & virtual exploration, distance/presence, reflection and penetration (x-ray, infrared, etc.), medical (MRI, PET), and astronomy, cameras that function as sensors, recording, and vision devices.

 






2013 Winter  

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 12:00pm-1:50pm - Elings Hall 2611

 

Arts 102
The Conceptual Art of Photoshop(4 units)

Tues-Thur 2:30-4:30pm - Estudio, old gym


A production course in data query, analysis, processing and visualization. The course begins with MySQL data query exercises to finetune data discovery skills. It is then followed by visualization assignments in the java based Processing environment. There are 4 projects: 1) A linear frequency visualization, 2) 2D spatial map, 3) a correlation with an external data source such as the NY TImes or Amazin, and 4) a 3D interactive visualization.

Every dataset contains the same scalar, numeric, time-based, semantic and other forms of metadata which allow for a multiplicity and complex modes of data correlation and representation. Our goal is to learn how to discover interesting patterns in the data, and how to visualizat it.

 


A project based art studio course focused on 2D image processing as an experimental tool and a creative medium. The course will examine Photoshop from both artistic and scientific perspectives with an introduction to its basis in signal processing, compression, scaling, convolutions, etc. all of which can be applied as creative techniques. We are going to begin with the PIXEL, and its relationship to other pixels surrounding it, then follow by exploring the potential of multi-layered images, and how various mathematical processes are used to create new kinds of images.

The historical references include 20th century photographic experimentations about the medium (Contructivism, Bauhaus, Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Abbott, etc.) and art movements that consider the primacy of concepts and ideas as the driving force behind the creative process. Assignments will bridge the technical experimentation with arrtistic and conceptual approaches to examine the nature of what is understood as art and the image. Topics covered will therfore include systems, processes, aesthetics, poetics, definitions and relational processes by which digital images can be considered.



2012 Fall  

MAT 254
Arts & Engineering Research (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 12pm-1:50pm, Elings Hall 2611

 

Arts 130
Digital Visual Culture(4 units)

Tues-Thur 9am-10:50pm - arts 434-121


Theoretical and applied directions in arts-engineering research currently taking place in the Experimental Visualization Lab. This course introduces methods, approaches, activities, and processes of sponsored research specific to the ExpVisLab. There are currently three research directions: 1) Seattle Public Library data visualization analysis, 2) Swarmrobotics camera, 3) James Bay Visual Ethnography Digital Cultural Atla.
 
Digital Visual Culture is an upper division course that examines the impact of digital processes on visual culture. The course includes an overview of projects, methods, and resources relevant to artmaking and its reception in the visual, spatial, temporal, conceptual and cultural domains.

The course will discuss the following topics: Selected literature overview; art as prototyping; systems of classification; the computational image; time-narrative; space-structure & form; digital visual design; machine culture, robotics; space-time & interactivity; numbers, systems, procedures, data space and algorithms; arts-science hybrid practices, optical computation technologies within and beyond the electromagnetic spectrum.

Courseload consists of lecture attendance, weekly topic reviews, attendance at selected visiting lectures, midterm test, and final report.


2012 Spr  

MAT 265
Open Studio in Optical-Computational Processes (4 units)

Wednesday 2pm-6pm, Elings Hall 2611

 

Arts 102
The Conceptual Art of Photoshop(4 units)

Tues-Thur 9am-10:50am - Estudio, old gym


An open studio projects course in which students will define a problem, and focused on camera, laser, and any devices connected to a computer to realize visualizations and other time-based projects. Each student will plan, realize and evaluate a project of their own. The course will function in the tradition of the studio critique where students present work-in-progress, get regular feedback from faculty and course participants. Completion of course will require a project, concept statement and online documentation featured on the course website.

The course will be mostly lab, individual meetings, and appx 3 work-in-progress student presentations and depending on the range of participants’ interests, lectures may be given on topics such as anamorphs, experiments in multiple exposure, spatial & virtual exploration, distance/presence, reflection and penetration (x-ray, infrared, etc.), medical (MRI, PET), and astronomy, cameras that function as sensors, recording, and vision devices.

 


A project based art studio course focused on 2D image processing as an experimental tool and a creative medium. The course will examine Photoshop from both artistic and scientific perspectives with an introduction to its basis in signal processing, compression, scaling, convolutions, etc. all of which can be applied as creative techniques. We are going to begin with the PIXEL, and its relationship to other pixels surrounding it, then follow by exploring the potential of multi-layered images, and how various mathematical processes are used to create new kinds of images.

The historical references include 20th century photographic experimentations about the medium (Contructivism, Bauhaus, Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Abbott, etc.) and art movements that consider the primacy of concepts and ideas as the driving force behind the creative process. Assignments will bridge the technical experimentation with arrtistic and conceptual approaches to examine the nature of what is understood as art and the image. Topics covered will therfore include systems, processes, aesthetics, poetics, definitions and relational processes by which digital images can be considered.



2012 W  

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 12:00pm-1:50pm - Estudio, old gym

 

Arts 130
Digital Visual Culture(4 units)

Tues-Thur 9am-10:50pm - arts 434-121


A production course in data query, analysis, processing and visualization. The course begins with MySQL data query exercises to finetune data discovery skills. It is then followed by visualization assignments in the java based Processing environment. There are 4 projects: 1) A linear frequency visualization, 2) 2D spatial map, 3) a correlation with an external data source such as the NY TImes or Amazin, and 4) a 3D interactive visualization.

Every dataset contains the same scalar, numeric, time-based, semantic and other forms of metadata which allow for a multiplicity and complex modes of data correlation and representation. Our goal is to learn how to discover interesting patterns in the data, and how to visualizat it.



 


Digital Visual Culture is an upper division course that examines the impact of digital processes on visual culture. The course includes an overview of projects, methods, and resources relevant to artmaking and its reception in the visual, spatial, temporal, conceptual and cultural domains.

The course will discuss the following topics: Selected literature overview; art as prototyping; systems of classification; the computational image; time-narrative; space-structure & form; digital visual design; machine culture, robotics; space-time & interactivity; numbers, systems, procedures, data space and algorithms; arts-science hybrid practices, optical computation technologies within and beyond the electromagnetic spectrum.

Courseload consists of lecture attendance, weekly topic reviews, attendance at selected visiting lectures, midterm test, and final report.

 



2011 Spr  

MAT 265
Open Studio in Optical-Computational Processes (4 units)

Wednesday 2pm-6pm, Elings Hall 2611

 

MAT594CP
Computational Photography Resources Links


An open studio projects course in which students will define a problem, and focused on camera, laser, and any devices connected to a computer to realize visualizations and other time-based projects. Each student will plan, realize and evaluate a project of their own. The course will function in the tradition of the studio critique where students present work-in-progress, get regular feedback from faculty and course participants. Completion of course will require a project, concept statement and online documentation featured on the course website.

The course will be mostly lab, individual meetings, and appx 3 work-in-progress student presentations and depending on the range of participants’ interests, lectures may be given on topics such as anamorphs, experiments in multiple exposure, spatial & virtual exploration, distance/presence, reflection and penetration (x-ray, infrared, etc.), medical (MRI, PET), and astronomy, cameras that function as sensors, recording, and vision devices.

 




2011 W  

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 11am-1pm - Estudio, old gym

 

Arts 102
The Conceptual Art of Photoshop(4 units)

Tues-Thur 2pm-3:50pm - Estudio, old gym


A lecture, lab & project course to explore the visual organization and representation of information. The course will address 3 ways to represent data visually: Linear, 2D, and 3D dimensional visual representation. Lectures and readings will focus on a range of conceptual models of data visual mapping as implemented in various disciplines, artistic, statistical and scientific, that are used to represent information visually.

Topics will include: Metadata, systems of classification, basics of visual design and narrative, various mapping and visualization algorithms. Technical lab demonstrations will concentrate on Java, OpenGL, and Processing. Some programming experience is desirable to easily follow Thurs lab demos and assignments.

 

 


A project based art studio course focused on 2D image processing as an experimental tool and a creative medium. The course will examine Photoshop from both artistic and scientific perspectives with an introduction to its basis in signal processing, compression, scaling, convolutions, etc. all of which can be applied as creative techniques. We are going to begin with the PIXEL, and its relationship to other pixels surrounding it, then follow by exploring the potential of multi-layered images, and how various mathematical processes are used to create new kinds of images.

The historical references include 20th century photographic experimentations about the medium (Contructivism, Bauhaus, Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Abbott, etc.) and art movements that consider the primacy of concepts and ideas as the driving force behind the creative process. Assignments will bridge the technical experimentation with arrtistic and conceptual approaches to examine the nature of what is understood as art and the image. Topics covered will therfore include systems, processes, aesthetics, poetics, definitions and relational processes by which digital images can be considered.



2010 F  
MAT 200a
Art & Technology (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 1:00-3:00pm, Interaction Visualization Lab 2611, Elings Hall (CNSI)
 

Arts 130
Digital Visual Culture(4 units)

Tues-Thur 11am-12:15pm - arts 1340


The M200a course “Intersections of Art & Technology” is designed for arts-engineering interdisciplinary collaborative work with a focus on a synthesis of creative arts-engineering problem-solving within a media arts context. Students are introduced to a set of strategies to conceptualize and plan out the realization of a media arts project ready for submission.

The course begins by formulating artistic practice as a research activity, a form of prototyping of ideas that address materials, systems, processes, structure and content. For engineers and musicians, the course functions as an introduction to the discipline. For artists who come from a wide range of backgrounds, the course provides common ground and a platform where they can contribute their specialized knowledge.

Key topics: Artists in research labs; Media Arts literature overview; Discipline overview; Steps in prototyping; Classification; Data Visualization; Mapping; Optical-Computational processes; Space-Structure-Form; Machine culture; Numeric, geometric, algorithms; Design process; Bio, genetic, eco projects; sound art in installations.

 


Digital Visual Culture is an upper division course that examines the impact of digital processes on visual culture. The course includes an overview of projects, methods, and resources relevant to artmaking and its reception in the visual, spatial, temporal, conceptual and cultural domains.

The course will discuss the following topics: Selected literature overview; art as prototyping; systems of classification; the computational image; time-narrative; space-structure & form; digital visual design; machine culture, robotics; space-time & interactivity; numbers, systems, procedures, data space and algorithms; arts-science hybrid practices, optical computation technologies within and beyond the electromagnetic spectrum.

Courseload consists of lecture attendance, weekly topic reviews, attendance at selected visiting lectures, midterm test, and final report.

 



2010 Spr  

MAT 594CP
Open Studio in Optical-Computational Processes (4 units)

Wednesday 2pm-6pm, Elings Hall 2611

 

 


An open studio projects course focused on camera, laser, and any devices connected to a computer to realize visualizations and other time-based projects.

Each student will plan, realize and evaluate a project of their own. The course will function in the tradition of the studio critique where students present work-in-progress, get regular feedback from faculty and course participants. Completion of course will require a project, concept statement and online documentation featured on the course website.

The course will be mostly lab, individual meetings, and appx 3 work-in-progress student presentations and depending on the range of participants’ interests, lectures may be given on topics such as anamorphs, experiments in multiple exposure, spatial & virtual exploration, distance/presence, reflection and penetration (x-ray, infrared, etc.), medical (MRI, PET), and astronomy, cameras that function as sensors, recording, and vision devices.

Equipment available for exploration include various XVGA resolution firewire cameras, a 3 color Prolaser ShowCube II laser, and a MT9 3D accelerometer.

 

 

 



2010 W  

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tuesday 11am-1pm, Thursday 11am-1pm - Estudio, old gym

 

Arts 102
The Conceptual Art of Photoshop(4 units)

Tues-Thur 2pm-4pm - Estudio, old gym


A lecture, lab & project course to explore the visual organization and representation of information. The course will address 3 ways to represent data visually: Linear, 2D, and 3D dimensional visual representation. Lectures and readings will focus on a range of conceptual models of data visual mapping as implemented in various disciplines, artistic, statistical and scientific, that are used to represent information visually.

Topics will include: Metadata, systems of classification, basics of visual design and narrative, various mapping and visualization algorithms. Technical lab demonstrations will concentrate on Java, OpenGL, and Processing. Some programming experience is desirable to easily follow Thurs lab demos and assignments.

 

 


A project based course focused on 2D image processing as an experimental tool and a creative medium. The course will review how the properties of signal processing, compression, scaling, convolutions, etc. can be useful as creative techniques. We are going to begin with the PIXEL, and its relationship to other pixels surrounding it, then follow by exploring the potential of multi-layered images, and how various mathematical processes are used to create new kinds of images.

The historical references include 20th century photographic experimentations about the medium (Contructivism, Bauhaus, Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Abbott, etc.) and art movements that consider the primacy of concepts and ideas as the driving force behind the creative process. Assignments will bridge the technical experimentation with arrtistic and conceptual approaches to examine the nature of what is understood as art and the image. Topics covered will therfore include systems, processes, aesthetics, poetics, definitions and relational processes by which digital images can be considered.



2009 F  
MAT 200a
Art & Technology (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 12:30-2:30pm, Interaction Visualization Lab 2611, Elings Hall (CNSI)
 

Arts 130
Digital Visual Culture(4 units)

Tues-Thur 10am-11:30am - arts 1340


The M200a course “Intersections of Art & Technology” is designed for arts-engineering interdisciplinary collaborative work with a focus on a synthesis of creative arts-engineering problem-solving within a media arts context. Students are introduced to a set of strategies to conceptualize and plan out the realization of a media arts project ready for submission.

The course begins by formulating artistic practice as a research activity, a form of prototyping of ideas that address materials, systems, processes, structure and content. For engineers and musicians, the course functions as an introduction to the discipline. For artists who come from a wide range of backgrounds, the course provides common ground and a platform where they can contribute their specialized knowledge.

Key topics: Artists in research labs; Media Arts literature overview; Discipline overview; Steps in prototyping; Classification; Data Visualization; Mapping; Optical-Computational processes; Space-Structure-Form; Machine culture; Numeric, geometric, algorithms; Design process; Bio, genetic, eco projects; sound art in installations.

 


Digital Visual Culture is an upper division course that examines the impact of digital processes on visual culture. The course includes an overview of projects, methods, and resources relevant to artmaking and its reception in the visual, spatial, temporal, conceptual and cultural domains.

The course will discuss the following topics: Selected literature overview; art as prototyping; systems of classification; the computational image; time-narrative; space-structure & form; digital visual design; machine culture, robotics; space-time & interactivity; numbers, systems, procedures, data space and algorithms; bio-genetics, self-organizing systems; arts-science hybrid practices.

Courseload consists of lecture attendance, weekly topic reviews, attendance at selected visiting lectures, midterm test, and final report.

 



2009 Spr  

MAT 594CP
Open Studio in Optical-Computational Processes (4 units)

Wednesday 2pm-6pm

 

 


An open studio projects course focused on camera, laser, and any devices connected to a computer to realize visualizations and other time-based events.

Each student will plan, realize and evaluate a project of their own. The course will function in the tradition of the studio critique where students present work-in-progress, get regular feedback from faculty and course participants. Completion of course will require a project, concept statement and project featured on the course website.

The course will be mostly lab, individual meetings, and appx 3 work-in-progress student presentations and depending on the range of participants’ interests, lectures may be given on topics such as anamorphs, experiments in multiple exposure, spatial & virtual exploration, distance/presence, reflection and penetration (x-ray, infrared, etc.), medical (MRI, PET), and astronomy, cameras that function as sensors, recording, and vision devices.

Equipment available for exploration include various XVGA resolution firewire cameras, a 3 color Prolaser ShowCube II laser, and a MT9 3D accelerometer.

 

 

 



2009 W  

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tuesday 11am-1pm, Thursday 11am-1pm - Estudio

 

Arts 102
The Conceptual Art of Photoshop(4 units)

Tues-Thur 2pm-4pm - Estudio


A lecture, lab & project course to explore the visual organization and representation of information. The course will address 3 ways to represent data visually: Linear, 2D, and 3D dimensional visual representation. Lectures and readings will focus on a range of conceptual models of data visual mapping as implemented in various disciplines, artistic, statistical and scientific, that are used to represent information visually.

Topics will include: Metadata, systems of classification, basics of visual design and narrative, various mapping and visualization algorithms. Technical lab demonstrations will concentrate on Java, OpenGL, and Processing. Some programming experience is desirable to understand Thurs lab demos.

 

 


"The Conceptual Art of Photoshop” is a studio course introducing artistic concepts and computational processes specific to the medium of digital image processing as expressed through graphics programs like Photoshop and GIMP. Art project assignments will explore the visual, perceptual, social and cultural properties of the digital image, in particular low-resolution visualization for artistic experimentation, and images produced directly through the properties of the software.

The course refers to Conceptual Art in particular to the primacy of concepts and ideas as the driving force behind the creative process, but also as an approach to examining the nature of what is understood as art and the image. The course will therefore explore systems, processes, definitions and relational processes by which digital images can be considered.



2008 F  
MAT 200a
Art & Technology (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 12:30-2:30pm, Interaction Visualization Lab 2611, Elings Hall (CNSI)
 

Arts 130
Digital Visual Culture(4 units)

Tues-Thur 10am-11:30am - arts 1340


The M200a course “Intersections of Art & Technology” is designed for arts-engineering interdisciplinary collaborative work. Students are teamed into 2 person artist-engineer groups to conceptualize and plan out the realization of a media arts project ready for submission to a competition, or festival.

The course begins by formulating artistic practice as a research activity, a form of prototyping of ideas that address materials, systems, processes, structure and content. For engineers and musicians, the course functions as an introduction to the discipline. For artists who come from a wide range of backgrounds, the course provides common ground and a platform where they can contribute their specialized knowledge.

Key topics: Artists in research labs; Media Arts literature overview; Discipline overview; Steps in prototyping; Classification; Data Visualization; Mapping; Optical-Computational processes; Space-Structure-Form; Machine culture; Numeric, geometric, algorithms; Design process; Bio, genetic, eco projects; sound art in installations.

 


Digital Visual Culture is an upper division course that examines the impact of digital processes on visual culture. The course includes an overview of projects, methods, and resources relevant to artmaking and its reception in the visual, spatial, temporal, conceptual and cultural domains.

The course will discuss the following topics: Selected literature overview; art as prototyping; systems of classification; 1960's Experiments in Arts & Technology; the computational image; time-narrative; space-structure & form; digital visual design; machine culture, robotics; space-time & interactivity; numbers, systems, procedures, data space and algorithms; bio-genetics, self-organizing systems; arts-science hybrid practices.

Courseload consists of lecture attendance, weekly topic reviews, attendance at selected visiting lectures, midterm test, and final report.

 



2008 spr  
MAT 594
Experimental Projects in Optical-Computational Processes

Tuesday 10am-12pm, Thursday 10am-12pm - Estudio
 

 


A projects based, lecture and lab course to explore the intersections of the optical camera and computers. Lecture topics will trace the use of the optical camera from analog historical models, to experiments in multiple exposure, spatial exploration, uses in surveillance, medical, astronomy, data collection, and cameras as sensors for machine vision and motion sensing.

Students define a project which may focus on creating non-conventional cameras, computer/machine vision, interactive techniques, exploration of devices dealing with optical representation such as anamorphs, or non-optical image scanning (MRI, CAT scans, etc.) Final work is a project documented through a research paper and project presentation.

 




 



2008 W  
MAT 256
Visual Design Through Algorithms: Explorations in Visual Perception (4 units)

Profs. Jerry Gibson, George Legrady
Tuesday 1-2pm, Thursday 12-3pm - Estudio
 

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tuesday 11am-1pm, Thursday 11am-1pm - Estudio


A team-taught course with goals to foster engineering-level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the visual arts. Course consists of lectures, some readings, and team-based production of 3 multimedia projects that explore mathematical visual processes, interactivity and visual perception.

The course’s goals are to foster both engineering level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the Visual Arts. Due to the inter-disciplinary nature of the course, students will be expected to work in teams, to achieve meaningful results in both Engineering and the Arts.

Course structure: weekly lectures by each faculty followed by lab production work.

 


A lecture and lab course to explore the visual organization and representation of information. Lectures and readings will focus on a range of conceptual models of data visual mapping as implemented in various disciplines, artistic, statistical and scientific, that are used to represent information visually.

Topics will include: Metadata, systems of classification, algorithmic models, time based linear animation, visual narrative, self-organizing and other mapping and visualization algorithms. Technical lab demonstrations will focus on SQL, PHP, and the Kohonen algorithm. Students will come to the course with the intent to explore and produce visualizations based on data sets of their choice.

 



2007 F  
MAT 200a
Art & Technology (4 units)

Tues-Thurs 1-3pm, Interaction Visualization Lab 2611, Elings Hall (CNSI)
 

Arts 130
Digital Visual Culture(4 units)

Thur 10am-12pm, Friday 10am-12pm - arts 1340


The M200a course “Intersections of Art & Technology” is designed for arts-engineering interdisciplinary collaborative work. Students are teamed into 2 person artist-engineer groups to conceptualize and plan out the realization of a media arts project ready for submission to a competition, or festival.

The course begins by formulating artistic practice as a research activity, a form of prototyping of ideas that address materials, systems, processes, structure and content. For engineers and musicians, the course functions as an introduction to the discipline. For artists who come from a wide range of backgrounds, the course provides common ground and a platform where they can contribute their specialized knowledge.

Key topics: Artists in research labs; Media Arts literature overview; Discipline overview; Steps in prototyping; Classification; Data Visualization; Mapping; Optical-Computational processes; Space-Structure-Form; Machine culture; Numeric, geometric, algorithms; Design process; Bio, genetic, eco projects; sound art in installations.

 


Digital Visual Culture is an upper division course that provides an overview of projects, methods, and resources representative of the impact of digital processes on artmaking and its reception in the visual, spatial, temporal, conceptual and cultural domains.

The course will discuss the following topics: Selected literature overview; art as prototyping; 1960's Experiments in Arts & Technology; the computational image; time-narrative; space-structure & form; digital visual design; machine culture, robotics; space-time & interactivity; numbers, systems, procedures, data space and algorithms; bio-genetics, self-organizing systems; arts-science hybrid practices.

Courseload consists of lecture attendance, weekly topic reviews, attendance at selected visiting lectures, midterm test, and final report.

 



2007 W  
MAT 256
Visual Design Through Algorithms: Explorations in Visual Perception (4 units)

Profs. Jerry Gibson, George Legrady
Tuesday 1-2pm, Thursday 12-3pm - Estudio
 

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tuesday 11am-1pm, Thursday 11am-1pm - Estudio


A team-taught course with goals to foster engineering-level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the visual arts. Course consists of lectures, some readings, and team-based production of 3 multimedia projects that explore mathematical visual processes, interactivity and visual perception.

The course’s goals are to foster both engineering level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the Visual Arts. Due to the inter-disciplinary nature of the course, students will be expected to work in teams, to achieve meaningful results in both Engineering and the Arts.

Course structure: weekly lectures by each faculty followed by lab production work.

 


A lecture and lab course to explore the aesthetic organization of information. Lectures and readings will focus on a range of conceptual models of data visual mapping as implemented in various disciplines, artistic, statistical and scientific, that are used to represent information visually.

Topics will include: Metadata, systems of classification, algorithmic models, time based linear animation, visual narrative, self-organizing and other mapping and visualization algorithms. Technical lab demonstrations will focus on SQL, PHP, and the Kohonen algorithm. Students will come to the course with the intent to explore and produce visualizations based on data sets of their choice.

 



2006 F  
MAT 200a
Art & Technology (4 units)

Thur 1-3pm, Friday 1-3pm - Estudio
 

Art 130
Visual Art As Culture(4 units)

Thur 10am-12pm, Friday 10am-12pm - arts 1340


The seminar provides an overview of the digital media arts discipline with an emphasis on innovative technological research as it relates to Visual and Spatial Arts activities. The intention of the 200A CORE seminar is to introduce the issues, directions and institutions of digital media arts practice, provide a range of examples, and reveal multidisciplinary possibilities for intersecting research and production in arts-engineering collaborative projects. Knowledge acquired in this course will be instrumental in shaping research directions and final projects for MAT students.

 


Exploration of the visual arts in a wide range of socio-cultural and economic contexts. Topics include art’s changing role in relation to the shifting parameters of culture, economy, high and low culture and new technologies.



2006 W  
MAT 256
Visual Design Through Algorithms: Explorations in Visual Perception (4 units)

Profs. Jerry Gibson, George Legrady
Tuesday 1-2pm, Thursday 12-3pm - Estudio
 

MAT 259
Visualizing Information (4 units)

Tuesday 10am-12pm, Thursday 10am-12pm - Estudio


A team-taught course with goals to foster engineering-level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the visual arts. Course consists of lectures, some readings, and team-based production of 3 multimedia projects that explore mathematical visual processes, interactivity and visual perception.

The course’s goals are to foster both engineering level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the Visual Arts. Due to the inter-disciplinary nature of the course, students will be expected to work in teams, to achieve meaningful results in both Engineering and the Arts.

Course structure: weekly lectures by each faculty followed by lab production work.

 


A lecture and lab course to investigate the organization of information for visualizations, and explore methods of visualizing data as a way to access new insights.

Lectures and readings will focus on a range of conceptual models of data visual mapping as implemented in scientific visualization: (http://iv.slis.indiana.edu/sw/index.html), and the formal design qualities of data visualization such as (http://www.visualcomplexity.com/vc/) and (http://www.cybergeography.org/atlas/).

Students will come to the course with the intent to produce a visualization based on a set of data of their choice.

 



2006 W  
MAT 594GL
Tutorial (4 units)

Scheduled Meetings, Art Dept, Rm 2222
 

 


A graduate tutorial course focused on individual research and production as determined by instructor.


 





2005 F  
MAT 200a
Media Art & Technology (4 units)

Thur 1-3pm - E-studio, Art Dept, Rm 2220
Fri 1-3pm - E-studio, or Eng Conference Room
 

ARTS 102
Aesthetics of the Algorithmic Image (4 units)

Wed-Fri 10:00-12:00 pm, E-studio, Art Dept, Rm 2220


The seminar provides an overview of the digital media arts discipline with an emphasis on innovative technological research as it relates to Visual and Spatial Arts activities. The intention of the 200A CORE seminar is to introduce the issues, directions and institutions of digital media arts practice, provide a range of examples, and reveal multidisciplinary possibilities for intersecting research and production in arts-engineering collaborative projects. Knowledge acquired in this course will be instrumental in shaping research directions and final projects for MAT students. It is therefore critical that the course be taken in the first year of the MAT graduate studies.

The seminar will incorporate the Digital Media Lecture Series consisting of lectures by visiting digital media practitioners and theorists in conjunction with the IGERT lecture series. Wednesdays meetings will consist of seminar related activities: faculty presentations, class discussions of student readings, research and presentations.

 


What is a digital image? What are the implications of an art practice that is grounded in numeric code? The focus of this course is to arrive at an understanding of the transformation of the image from analogue to digital data and to discover aesthetic possibilities for algorithmic visualization.

Students will gain production skills in creating and processing digital images through computer code, and learn how to work with algorithms to produce images from pure mathematical data. Topics addressed through weekly lectures, readings, and demos will consider algorithms as an artistic tool for producing visualization: Information Theory’s noise and signal, aesthetics based on the executable code, and the influence of the conceptual art movement of the 1960s.

An introduction to creating through computer code will be the basic production tool.

 



2005 W  
MAT 256
Visual Design Through Algorithms: Explorations in Visual Perception (4 units)

Profs. Jerry Gibson, George Legrady
Tuesday 1-2pm, Thursday 12-3pm - Estudio
 

ARTS 22
Conceptual Strategies in Digital Media (4 units)

Tuesdays 5:00-6:50 pm, HSSB-1173


The course will focus on the production of an interactive installation where aesthetic and technical issues in the production of an interactive telematic visual environment will be addressed. Topics to be covered include visual perception, delivery of real-time televisual signals, design and implementation of 3D devices to control remote cameras, and to record viewer actions, insertion of controlled distortions, and the measurement of significant human responses.

The course’s goals are to foster both engineering level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the Visual Arts. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the course, students will be expected to work in teams, to achieve meaningful results in both Engineering and the Arts.

Course structure: weekly lectures by each faculty followed by lab production work.


 

Prerequisites: Art Studio 1A, 4D recommended; open to non-majors. May be repeated for credit to maximum of 8 units. Letter grade required for majors.

Lower Division lecture class, taught at the practical level in section by Teaching Assistants. An introductory course to the digital media arts discipline where students are introduced to conceptual, cultural, technical, theoretical issues and methodologies addressing the production of 2D based digital media projects. Topics addressed include interface design, data classification, information systems, chance, noise, and mapping. Students are introduced to Photoshop, html, and basic programming to realize the assignments.

 



2004 F  
MAT 200A
Art & Technology

Monday 5-7pm - HSSB 1174
Wednesday 5-7pm - Estudio
  ARTS 185GL
Advanced Tutorial(4 units)

Monday 5-7pm - HSSB 1174
Wednesday 3-7pm - Estudio


The seminar provides an overview of the digital media arts discipline with an emphasis on innovative technological research as it relates to Visual and Spatial Arts activities. The intention of the 200A CORE seminar is to introduce the issues, directions and institutions of digital media arts practice, provide a range of examples, and reveal multidisciplinary possibilities for intersecting research and production in arts-engineering collaborative projects. Knowledge acquired in this course will be instrumental in shaping research directions and final projects for MAT students. It is therefore critical that the course be taken in the first year of the MAT graduate studies.

The seminar will incorporate the Digital Media Lecture Series consisting of lectures by visiting digital media practitioners and theorists on Monday evenings. Wednesdays meetings will consist of seminar related activities: faculty presentations, class discussions of student readings, research and presentations. The presentations and final project is to be realized as a web document.


 
Prerequisites: Arts 22, Arts102 or Arts122, and consent of the instructor.

An upper division tutorial course for advanced students wanting to undertake individual research and production within the context of a graduate level discourse.


2004 S
 
ARTS 1A
Digital Media Discipline Overview

  ART & MAT COURSES
Legrady Mixed Resources





2004 S  
MAT 594L
Research Tutorial(4 units)
Individual schedule
 

ARTS 102
Digital Media ToolBox
(4 units)
THE AESTHETICS OF (VISUAL) NOISE
Tues-Thurs 10:00-12:50 pm, E-studio


MAT594L is a project based tutorial course consisting of research and project realization supervised through individual meetings. Each student defines a research project of interest to them, then a plan for the quarter is defined. The project is realized through the duration of the quarter. Students meet with faculty through individual meetings every week, or every 2nd week. There is a group presentation at the end of the quarter.

The conditions for completion of the course are as follows:
- Research project is defined at beginning
- Project is realized during quarter
- Individual meetings throughout quarter
- Presentation at the end of the quarter
- Web documentation to be added to course website.


 
In the conventional relationship between signal and noise , engineers normally aim to minimize noise (unwanted or unplanned information) to purify the signal (planned and ordered information). The goal of this semester's research and work will be to collect data, examine, extract and synthesize meaning out of noise and create projects using noise. Students' work will include research, data collecting, and projects based on topics covered in the lectures.

Material presented to the class will begin with a historical review with Russolo's "art of noise" (Futurism 1920’s,) Pierre Schaeffer's "musique concrete" (radio era 1950's), vacuum cleaner sounds; expressions of noise in nature and art throughout the 20th and 21st Century: Futurism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, surveillance image processing algorithms, (1960's), weather patterns (chaos theory), genomics, streaming online data, etc. Basic technical examples will cover Brownian motion, Gaussian distribution, random walks, an overview of Claude Shannon's Information Theory (redundancy, entropy, channel).




2004 W  
MAT 594
Visual Design Through Algorithms: Visual Explorations of Physical Processes (4 units)

Profs. Jerry Gibson, George Legrady
Tuesday 1-2pm, Thursday 12-3pm - Estudio
 

ARTS 122
Advanced Projects in Interactive Media (4 units)

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE AESTHETICS OF ALGORITHMIC VISUALIZATION
Tues-Thurs 10:00-12:50 pm, E-studio


The course will consist of an overview of mathematical processes and algorithms related to fundamental engineering results, leading to innovative experimentations in visualizations through the learned algorithms. Topics to be covered include 1) Filtering, sampling, and reconstruction, 2) Fourier Series, Orthogonal Series, and Approximations, 3) Convolution and System Response, 4) Transfer Functions and Filtering, 5) Mutual Information, 6) The likelihood ratio and hypothesis testing, 7) Markov Chains, 8) Discrete Transforms, Self-similar transforms.

The course’s goals are to foster both engineering level research in conjunction with the experimental approach of the Visual Arts. Due to the inter-disciplinary nature of the course, students will be expected to work in teams, to achieve meaningful results in both Engineering and the Arts.

Course structure: weekly lectures by each faculty followed by lab production work.


 
An undergraduate art course focused on the aesthetics of algorithmic visualization. Students will be given an overview of designing still and time-based visualizations through writing basic computer scripts and resulting in large scale prints or digital video.

Topics addressed through weekly lectures, readings, and demos will consider algorithms as a tool for producing visualization: Information Theory’s noise and signal, aesthetics based on the executable code, and the influence of the conceptual art movement of the 1960s.
Writing computer code will be the basic production tool. A knowledge of coputer programming is definitely useful but not necessary as the basics will be covered.


2003 Spr  
MAT 253
NavigatingInformation Space

Monday 5-7pm, Wednesday 5-7pm - Estudio
   


MAT 253 is a self-directed project based course where each student will be responsible for defining all aspects of their project's goals, production and realization. The projects can address any topic of individual interest and any production goals from pure technical solutions to applied or creative work as long as it integrates camera vision, the issue of interface and digital technology. The expectation is that students will be conversant or acquire the necessary technical skills to realize a working project or tangible product such as a software, a prototype, or an artwork. Interdisciplinary team-based work is encouraged as the function of the course is to provide a forum for concept development, solution methods, information exchange and project realization.


   


2003 W  
MAT 200A
Art & Technology

Monday 5-7pm - HSSB 1174
Wednesday 5-7pm - Estudio
  ARTS 22
Conceptual Strategies in Digital Media (4 units)

Tuesdays 6:30-8:20 pm, HSSB-1173


The seminar provides an overview of developments in digital media practice of the last four decades with an emphasis on the intersection of art practice and innovative technological research as it relates to visual and spatial arts. The intention of the 200A CORE seminar is to introduce the issues, directions and institutions of digital media practice, provide a range of examples, and reveal multidisciplinary possibilities for intersecting technological research and production in multimedia projects. Knowledge acquired in this course will be instrumental in shaping research directions and final projects for MAT students. It is therefore critical that the course be taken in the first year of the MAT graduate studies.

The seminar will incorporate the Digital Media Lecture Series consisting of regular lectures by visiting digital media practitioners and theorists to be given on Monday evenings from 5mp to 7pm. Wednesdays meetings will consist of faculty presentations, class discussions of student readings, research and presentations. The presentations and final project is to be realized as a web document.


 
Prerequisites: Art Studio 1A, 4D recommended; open to non-majors. May be repeated for credit to maximum of 8 units. Letter grade required for majors.

Lower Division lecture class, taught at the practical level in section by Teaching Assistants. This is the introductory course to digital media processes where students are introduced to conceptual, cultural, technical, theoretical issues and methodologies addressing the production of 2D based digital media projects. Topics addressed include interface design, data classification, information systems, chance, noise, and mapping. Students are introduced to Photoshop, and html to realize the assignments.


2002 F  
MAT 251
Motion Sensing Interactive Installation Design

Monday 5-9pm - estudio
  ARTS 22
Conceptual Strategies in Digital Media (4 units)

Tuesdays 6:30-8:20 pm, HSSB-1173


A MAT graduate level projects course in which students will learn how to design and produce an interactive artwork where the movement of the spectator sensed through a video camera in a defined space will be used to control and select data of images and sounds in an installation. Students will work in small teams to design and implement a project of their own which will explore feedback interaction.

The course will concentrate on the conventions and design of interactive installations, and the planning of the dramaturgy for human-computer feedback interaction, taking into consideration the perceptual and social dynamics of audience location and movement. Students will conceptualize and produce a project while learning the technical skills. The task will be to create a work that will be "event" based and successfully integrate sound, text, image through the sensing of movement, or behavior of participants over time.


 
Prerequisites: Art Studio 1A, 4D recommended; open to non-majors. May be repeated for credit to maximum of 8 units. Letter grade required for majors.

Lower Division lecture class, taught at the practical level in section by Teaching Assistants. This is the introductory course to digital media processes where students are introduced to conceptual, cultural, technical, theoretical issues and methodologies addressing the production of 2D based digital media projects. Topics addressed include interface design, data classification, information systems, chance, noise, and mapping. Students are introduced to Photoshop, and html to realize the assignments.


2002 S  
MAT 251
Projects in Camera Controls as Interface in Real and Virtual Spaces

Monday 5-7pm - estudio
  ARTS 22
Conceptual Strategies in Digital Media (4 units)

Lecture Thursdays 6-8pm

MAT 251 is a self-directed project based course where each student will be responsible for defining all aspects of their project's goals, production and realization. The projects can address any topic of individual interest and any production goals from pure technical solutions to applied or creative work as long as it integrates camera vision, the issue of interface and digital technology. The expectation is that students will be conversant or acquire the necessary technical skills to realize a working project or tangible product such as a software, a prototype, or an artwork. Interdisciplinary team-based work is encouraged as the function of the course is to provide a forum for concept development, solution methods, information exchange and project realization.


 
Prerequisites: Art Studio 1A, 4D recommended; open to non-majors. May be repeated for credit to maximum of 8 units. Letter grade required for majors.

Lower Division lecture class, taught at the practical level in section by Teaching Assistants. This is the introductory course to digital media processes where students are introduced to conceptual, cultural, technical, theoretical issues and methodologies addressing the production of 2D based digital media projects. Topics addressed include interface design, data classification, information systems, chance, noise, and mapping. Students are introduced to Photoshop, and html to realize the assignments.


2002 W  
MAT 200A
Art & Technology

Monday 5-7pm - HSSB 1174
Wednesday 5-7pm - Estudio
  ARTS 122
Advanced Projects in Interactive Media

Monday and Wednesday 1 to 3:30pm, Kerr Hall, estudio

This survey course provides an overview of developments in digital media practice of the last two decades with an emphasis on the intersection of art practice and innovative technological research as it relates to visual and spatial arts. The seminar will incorporate the Digital Media Lecture Series consisting of regular lectures by visiting digital media practitioners and theorists.
 
An advanced studio course in interface design and interactivity. The course will address issues and concepts of interface design with a special focus on metaphoric visualization at the nanolevel and motion sensing interactivity. Students will be introduced to the topic of nanotechnology and camera motion sensing using the Trackthemcolors Xtra conjunction with the Lingo scripting language in the Macromedia Director environment. Familiarity with Macromedia Director and Lingo scripting language is a prerequisite.



2001 F  
MAT 251
Camera Controls as Interface in Real and Virtual Spaces
  Phelps Hall 1517 (G4 lab) - ARTS 2222 (Estudio)
Monday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Information design and interactive media installation production are brought together in this course through the implementation of camera motion sensing as a means of controlling data selection of images and sounds. Students will work in small teams to design and implement a project of their own which will explore how to create information selection beyond the convention of the keyboard and mouse.In addition to the technical introduction, the course will closely look at the meaning of interactivity, interaction design, and the planning of the dramaturgy for human-computer feedback interaction, taking into consideration the perceptual and social dynamics of audience location and movement.


 
of interactivity in installations and take into consideration the social dynamics of audience movement and public space. Students will conceptualize and produce a project while learning the technical skills. The task will be to create a work that will be "event" based and successfully integrate sound, text, image with the sensing of movement, or behavior of people in a public space.


2001 S  
ARTS 194
Human Space Tool user interface design methodology
  Phelps Hall 1517 (G4 lab) - ARTS 2222 (Estudio)
Tues-Thurs 12:00 pm to 2:50 pm

Human Space Tool, user face design methodology will be team taught by Professor George Legrady and visiting professor of design Martin Grothmaak, Projekttriangle, Stuttgart. This course will focus on the acquisition of conceptual, design and practical skills necessary for the development of an innovative and professional digital user-interface design.The course will consist of two components:
PART 1 - A study about user interface design with an emphasis on the following issues: what is user interface design?

what is user-ergonomy? what are the social aspects of web interaction? what is information architecture? what are the main basic parameters of information design?Some methods will be introduced by which to visualize abstract dynamic processes, define orientation, navigation, workflow, "dramaturgie", aesthetics, and visualization models. These will be discussed through examples and research projects.

PART 2 - It will involve the creation of teams who will apply the learned methodologies and techniques to create a redesign of two existing campus web sites.



2001 SPR  
MAT 200A
Survey of Art and Technology

ARTS 2222 (Estudio)
Tues-Thurs 10:00 a.m. to 11:50 p.m.
  ARTS 122
Advanced Topics in Digital Media

Phelps Hall 1517 (G4 lab)
Tues-Thurs 2:00pm to 4:50pm

This survey course provides an overview of developments in digital media practice of the last two decades with an emphasis on the intersection of art practice and innovative technological research as it relates to visual and spatial arts.
 
A production course in interactive media with a conceptual approach to the structuring of information. Digital environments require metaphor based models by which they become meaningful to the user. Relevant topics specific to the course such as metaphor, multi-linearity, Peirce’s semiotics (signs), Shannon’s Information theory, narrative strategies, plot development through layering fragmentation, mapping, icons/logos, and the shift in meaning that takes place through time, will be covered through lecture and visual presentations.



2001 W  
MAT 203
The Intersection of Art, Technology and Culture

ARTS 2222 (E-Studio)
Tues-Thurs 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
  ARTS 122
Advanced Topics in Digital Media

Phelps Hall 1517 (G4 lab)
Tues-Thurs 2:00pm to 4:50pm

A seminar that reviews current issues, methods, questions related to how art practice, and visual culture intersect with technology and culture, with special attention to convergences and differences between the various related industries. The seminar will begin with two texts that address the process of artistic practice and its transition from personal experience to its integration into the discipline's discourse. In addition to the readings, weekly presentations will be given on time based interactive art and other relevant works to the topics at hand.

Student workload consists of participation, regular presentation of the readings, a brief report in HTML of each presented readings and a student defined final project to come out of the topics covered in discussions.
 
Multimedia production with a focus on strategies of narrative for fine arts studio work. Production work to explore the organization and visualization of information expressed through complex, multi-linear structures. Emphasis is on innovative ways by which to conceptualize, design and create interactive media that go beyond the conventions of commercial productions. Students will be expected to demonstrate skills in three areas: creativity and conceptual thinking, interface design, and technical skills in production and Macromedia Director's Lingo programming language.